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CLASSIC EXCHANGE NEWSLETTER
SEPTEMBER 2015 CX


Thank you to ELECTRIC RADIO MAGAZINE and Ray Osterwald, N0DMS, ER Editor,
for the continuing support in publicizing the CX.
http://www.ermag.com/


HIGHLIGHTS AND AWARDS

HIGH SCORES - FOUR OR MORE RECEIVER TRANSMITTER PAIRS (UNLIMITED)

N6KN Rocco again claimed the top score with a 567,432 points! He was also the high SSB scorer!
W8KGI Jim placed second with a score of 374,166.
JA3KNB Kazu was again in third place with a score of 363,904 and the high AM score.


HIGH SCORES - THREE OR FEWER RECEIVER TRANSMITTER PAIRS

N2BE John is again at the top of this category with a score of 76,424.
K3MD John took second place with 31,948 points.
W4BOH Wilson dropped to third place with a score of 27,164 points.


JAPAN - US CONTACTS IN CX

Unfortunately propagation conditions limited the opportunities for CX QSOs with Japan so there were no succesful exchanges made during the September 2015 CX.

JAPAN - US 2016 WINTER CX SCHEDULE

21045 kHz CW between 0000 UTC(0900 JST) and 0100 UTC(1000 JST) on February 1, 2016.
14045 kHz CW between 0100 UTC(1000 JST) and 0200 UTC(1100 JST) on February 1, 2016.

21045 kHz CW between 0000 UTC(0900 JST) and 0100 UTC(1000 JST) on February 3, 2016.
14045 kHz CW between 0100 UTC(1000 JST) and 0200 UTC(1100 JST) on February 3, 2016.


BEST PRACTICE IN BOAT ANCHOR REPAIR

K3MSB Mark reported that his TX (BC-459A) was running pretty good a few months ago, then it got a rough note all of a sudden. "I gave the front panel a good thump (in a loving manner of course....) and the problem cleared up."


BEST CHIRP OR CLICK

K3MD John Is the clear winner in this category with a trifectra. He was notified by an OO that his signal had drift, chirp and a T8 note. John noted that his HG-10 VFO, Knightkit T-60 and ARC-5 are working up to their design standards!

W8UT Al received a less comprehensive but, perhaps, even more significant and demanding report when his XYL let him know his Invader 2000's key clicks were tearing up her TV.

W4BOH Wilson reports he used chirp to select which of his four Signal Shifters to put on each band. Inquiring minds want to know: Was he was sorting for maximum or minimum chirp?


PROPAGATION

N2BE John reported that on the CW Sunday morning, 40 meter propagation was weird. Don't you just love that technical talk?

HOWIE WB2AWQ/7 presented things in a different technical style: Sunday would have been better if not for the CME early Sunday morning. An index up to 43. Really snubbed the bands down.

W4BOH Wilson described it very succinctly: Propagation was awful (as bad as I can remember). A powerful statement considering how old Wilson and his gear are.

N2BE John gave a more accurate description of conditions and an explanation why N6KN did not seem to be bothered. Now, wait a minute ... the sun was shining, the "D-layer" was activated, and we were on 40 meters; and yet there was Rocco. I guess Rocco never got the memo saying that he can't do that.
John further observed that past experiences tell him that Rocco wins because he is signing "N6KN", and it has nothing to do with skip. It's all about "call magic."

VE7BGP GERRY Propagation was so poor for the CW weekend and the weather was nice, so I also got exercise Cycling.


LIKED CX / FUN / FIRST CX

N6KN RoccoThis was a very mellow event on a weekday
Several remarked some stations had been hunting for CX stations after working me, by the way. We are more popular than you might think.
ROCCO'S THEORY
People really want to work classic stations and are willing to dust off whatever is classic to them to make a contact.
This sort of "event" station operating seems to be becoming more popular than just regular old rag chews, and our "Classic Radio" tagline seems to fit right in. These casual operators may be uncomfortable joining a round-table of experienced classic operators, but they will call if it is easy for them to understand the exchange and that their new Icoms or whatever are welcome.

W8KGI Jim Well another CX, and I had fun. I do enjoy getting my old gear going on AM and SSB for the CX

N2BE John And ... as always, it was fun.

N2ATB Tony As always, I enjoyed the contest.
Operated AM for the first time in CX

K3MD John Really had fun.

W2JEK Donald I like the two day idea. Was a lot of fun.

W4BOH Wilson Some hams find enjoyment is different ways, for example Wilson's comment: Fall Frustration! Worst Performance ever!

JO3TAP TOMO This is the first time will participate in the CX.

N7CQR Dan My first CX event


UNUSUAL RIGS

The 1930s technology was certainly on the air this CX.

K4JYS Bill was running a homebrew, 20 watts input, 2A5 transmitter paired with a National "SW-3" regenerative receiver. This gave Bill a complete early-to-mid-1930s station.

WT2W Jim was running a homebrew version of a 1929 Hartley MOPA, with 50 watts input with a 211 PA.

N2AK Mario had a homebrew with a pair of #53 tubes running 10 watts of power.

The WWII era unusual gear was also noteworthy.

W4BOH Wilson described his rigs as Several somewhat silly Signal Shifters sending CQCX sequentially in September.

Following his Signal Shifters was an HT-9. Wilson opines that HT stands for Herniagenic Transmitter and is perhaps the heaviest 100W rig in modern times!

Picture shows front panel and under chassis of Wilson's two HT-9s.


MURPHY IN THE SHACK

K3MD JOHN The Story:
80M ARC-5 blew fuse... plugged in power cord to modified HP-23B wrong. Later OK
TR-4 died on 40.... dirty switch.
Worked on rigs around 2 months to get them working. AC-1 works but puts out 0.2 W!!!!!

W8UT Al Then the KWM-2 didn't want to key up on CW for me, dunno what it's trouble is, worked last time OK on CW.

N2KN Rocco I was plagued with problems on Sunday. Spent most of the day trying to fix things. These boatanchors don't like to sit unused on a shelf!


SPECIAL RECOGNITION

K3MD John will have an article out in CQ this month (homebrew retro QRP), and an article on antennas coming out in Nuts and Volts.

W8KGI Jim gave a presentation on Boat Anchor gear and a live hands on demonstration at the Duke City Hamfest in August.


AN OFFER YOU CAN'T REFUSE

W4BOH
Hallicrafters HT-9.
They were expensive and unwieldy and few were sold. Would you like to own one? It could be arranged. Who knows, you might even be able to have TWO!




ATTRIBUTION AND DISCLAIMER

The CX Newsletter is intended for the enjoyment of CX participants and others interested in the restoration, operation and enjoyment of Classic Ham Gear. This Newsletter was prepared from materials submitted by CX participants, from on-the-air observations, QSOs, and publically posted comments on various reflectors. Editorial comments on Individual Reports are shown in [Italics]. Any errors, omissions, or insensitive comments are unintentional. Please let me know if you have suggestions on improving the Newsletter or the CX website.

Thanks and 73,
Mac, WQ8U


SCORES SUBMITTED

You can read the individual reports by clicking on the call or scrolling below the Scores Table.

tr>
SEPTEMBER 2015 CX NAME CWAMSSBFMBONUSTOTALCOMMENT
N6KNRocco 27,778-537,654-2,000567,432 High Overall and High SSB Scores
W8KGIJim 317,1002,22054,846--374,166 High CW Score
JA3KNBKazu 148,10464,720148,080-3,000363,904 High AM Score
K2RPRon 108,75614,439182,722-4,000309,917
N2ATBTony 49,9563,47231,752-2,00087,180
N2BEJohn 32,800-43,624--76,424
K3MDJohn 31,948----31,948
W4BOHWilson 26,164--1,00027,164
VE7BGPGerry --13,124--13,124
JO3TAPTomo 4,7702,8804,230--11,880
K4JYSBill 9,312---2,00011,312
W2JEKDonald 7,038-828-3,00010,866
WB2AWQ/7Howie 9,828----9,828
W8UTAl 440-6,300--6,740
W8TMPaul 3,916-2,772--3,916
WQ8UMac 3,247----3,247
K3MSBMark 1,500----1,500
N7CQRDan 1,116----1,116
K3KYRJeff -----
W8ZRJim -----


REPORTS

N6KN ROCCO

CW CX
Due to a bad back and a stuffed shack, I sold many of my larger boatanchors and replaced them with radios I can move more easily. I managed to check out most of them prior to the CW CX, but I lost several transmitters during the event. So � some of the rigs are new to CX for me (although �old� enough to qualify.)

I began on 7045 early Sunday morning and managed to work John, N2BE, before the band shortened up. W8ZR was strong into Palos Verdes with his Drake C line. I moved to 3545 at 1538 with Ron, K2RP, and we traded QSOs for a while. I had severe QRM from the Salmon Runners on 20. I worked a few more stalwarts on 20 and then had to leave for family events at 2000.

Tuesday was wiped out with other family commitments and work, so the CW portion of this CX was pretty slim for me.

PHONE CX
The conditions were certainly much better for this part of CX. I began on 3.897 with Ron, K2RP (who has a very impressive collection of CX rigs), and had most of my SSB stations qualified by noon PDT after moving to 7280. At 2115, after lunch with the YL, I found 14270 open and put the beam ENE. I had a continuous pileup of stations from then to 0200. Notables included: Nick, K5EF, with a nice CE100V/600L combo; Mike, KA7RCN, with his HW101 and WRL Galaxy 2000; Roy, KB5MD, with a nice HT32B/SS115; Duncan, VE3GNI (his SB401/301 pair were built by his father and him back in the 70s); and Larry, WD0FRX, with an SB104A built just four months ago!)

Tuesday afternoon after work I managed to get on 14270 again with a very clear frequency and very little noise. I called �CQ Classic Exchange� and managed to work another 100 or so stations.

John, K0GMO, had a terrific SB34 on the air; Jim, WB0F, had a nice sounding SR400 A; Shawn, WA0IIH�s KWM-2 had a very low SN (061); and last but not least, two separate stations reported having relatives� dogs named �Rocco.�

This was a very mellow event on a weekday, and it was nice to hear John, N2BE, with his SR160 with a great signal. I have a feeling that other CX regulars were probably down on 40 and 75 in the evening, but 20 was wide open with very strong signals all over the country. There were many stations out there who take great pride in putting their classic radios on the air, or at least talking about them. Several remarked that they had been hunting for CX stations after working me, by the way. We are more popular than you might think.

ROCCO'S THEORY
So - how does this work? I have a theory to reiterate here - most of the US turn their beams or at least listen to the west in the evening. I have a modest station, but the beam at 60 ft is high enough to get into the east coast under these conditions, and I suspect that I am one of the few stations that is easy to work for most of the guys running wires, low dipoles, mobile antennas, etc. So - it is an easy way for them to make a short contact (or ANY contact), and I think a lot of them just listen to see what they can hear, including the stories about older rigs they are running or at least remember running.

I spoke slowly and carefully and very politely explained what information I needed from them, and mentioned our website. Many of the newbies (there were many, including some /AG's), were obviously new to HF - a few gave me their last names as well as the first names, and more than one did not understand what a "rig" is (never take anything for granted). I made it a point to compliment anyone with a "classic" radio - there is a real pride of ownership out there, even for very modest "classic" radios.

This sort of "event" station operating seems to be becoming more popular than just regular old rag chews, and our "Classic Radio" tagline seems to fit right in. These casual operators may be uncomfortable joining a round-table of experienced classic operators, but they will call if it is easy for them to understand the exchange and that their new Icoms or whatever are welcome.

As the band closes down, the signals peak, so there is a rolling wave of enhanced signal strength running from east to west, and it is easy to attract attention. The pileup on me was a dozen deep most of the time. People really want to work classic stations and are willing to dust off whatever is classic to them to make a contact. I am pretty sure many of them googled the BW 6100 to see what it is.
END THEORY

All in all, I had a lot more luck with the phone section of this CX than the CW, and I thought the conditions were great.

CW rigs:
HT32B/R4B; SR400A; Galaxy V; HT44/SX117; GSB-100/NC300; DX60/SB303; Ranger 2/RME6900; 75A-2; 32S-3.
SSB Rigs:
SR400A; HT32B/R4B;Galaxy v; BW6100/75A-4; TR4; T4Xc/R4C; NCX5; SB404/301; FTDX570; GSB100/NC300; San 500 CX; TS900; 32S-3/51J-4, HQ170, R388, SX73, TS820S.

SCORE:
CW: 34 QSOs x 817 years = 27,778 pts
SSB: 366 QSOs x 1469 years = 537,654 pts
Grand total with bonuses = 567,432 pts

73,
Rocco N6KN

Click
here to return to score table.


W8KGI JIM

Mac,
Well another CX, and I had fun.

Between Sunday and Tuesday the CW portion was reasonably active on 20, 40, and 80.

But on Phone on both days together I managed to work only two other genuine CXers, Mike, WB0SND for 38 "contacts" where we both changed over equipment pairs, and Nick, K5ER, for one contact while Mike was changing stations.

If it hadn't been for Mike and for Dave, NE5E, in San Antonio who was running a TR4C and wasn't working the CX but was patient with me through 9 contacts on Tuesday, I would have had a big fat ZERO for my SSB score.

I heard no CXers at all on AM, but I did call in to the local 7293 roundtable of guys in Phoenix and Tuscon on Tuesday morning which gave me 8 contacts and one qualified pair.

I tried working the Phone CX yesterday from NM. I got on 20 SSB about 2130 Z after we got home from church and lunch with friends. Luckily Mike, WB0SND from Desoto, MO was also around and answered my CQ. We carried on for nearly an hour and a half on 14260, changing rigs and receivers and helping each other get gear qualified. Nick, K5EF from LA broke in for one contact while Mike was changing rigs, and VE7BGP worked Mike at the very end for a single contact but couldn't hear me. Beyond us there was no other activity on 20. I got on 40 after that and called CQ CX periodically for several hours with no takers. There was no AM activity at all. On 20 SSB I qualified my Eldico SSB-100, Apache /SB-10, B&W-6100, and Heath SB-400, receivers NC-303, HQ-170, 75A3, HRO-5TA1, SX-73, SX-28A, BC348R and HQ-120, and my Collins KWM-1.

I do enjoy getting my old gear going on AM and SSB for the CX, but the last few times it's been hardly worth the effort for the number of CXers I've actually talked to. Hmmm ...
Hope you guys back east did better.

I'm attaching my score summary, equipment age summary, and log pages. I did catch all of the available bonus points, with my HB 6AG7/6146 and HRO50 novice gear and with my WRL rigs (Globe King 275, Globe Chief 90, and Globe Scout 680) and Hallicrafters receivers (SX-28, SX-28A and SX73).

Thanks for all of your good work, and CU on the CX in February.

73,
Jim, W8KGI

Click
here to return to score table.


JA3KNB KAZU

CW Report
I managed 23 pieces of gear for CW.
Other times I used to repair and sleep

. It is not possible to QSO with the United States this time.

CX Machinery List(2015 Sep)CW
Collins 75S-3C 32S-3 (1968)
Collins 75S-1 32S-1 (1960)
Collins KWM-2 (1960)
HeathkitHW-8 NO1 (1975)
HeathkitHW-8 NO2 (1975)
Drake Cline NO1(R-4C 1976 T-4XC 1976)

Hammarlund HQ100-A(1960) Heathkit DX-40 (1957) FT200 (1970)
Drake TR-4 (1966)
Drake Cline NO2(R-4C 1976 T-4XC 1976) TS-130 (1980)
FT101ES(1975)
Heathkit SB-102 (1970)
Hallicrafters SX-111 HT-37 (1960)
Hallicrafters SX-99(1955) *HT-37
Heathkit SB-104A(1) (1978)
Heathkit SB-104A(1) SB-104A(2) (1978)

QSOs CW Sunday = 51
QSOs CW Tuesday = 51
Total CW QSOs = 102
Age of CW gear qualified= 1,452 Years
Combined Sunday and Tuesday CW score is then 102 x 1,452 = 148,104

SSB Report I managed 20 pieces of gear for SSBand
CX Machinery List(2015 Sep)SSB
Collins 75S-3C 32S-3 (1968)
Collins 75S-1 32S-1 (1960)
Collins KWM-2 (1960)
Drake Cline NO1(R-4C 1976 T-4XC 1976)
FT200 (1970)
Drake TR-4 (1966)
Drake Cline NO2(R-4C 1976 T-4XC 1976) TS-130 (1980)
FT101ES(1975)
Heathkit SB-102 (1970)
Hallicrafters SX-111 HT-37 (1960)
Hallicrafters SX-99(1955) *HT-37
Hammarlund HQ100-A(1960) *HT-37
Heathkit SB-104A(1) (1978)
Heathkit *SB-104A(1)SB-104A(2)

QSOs SSB Sunday = 75
QSOs SSB Tuesday = 45
Total SSB QSOs = 120
Age of SSB gear qualified = 1,234 Years
Combined Sunday and Tuesday SSB score is then 120 x 1,234 = 148,080

AM Report
It was only 15 m using 2 ele HB9CV(15).
I managed 15 pieces of gear for AM
Drake Cline NO1(R-4C 1976 T-4XC 1976)
Drake *T-4XC Collins 75S-1
Drake *T-4XC Collins 75S-3C
Hammarlund HQ100-A(1960) Heathkit DX-40(1957)
FT200 (1970)
Drake TR-4 (1966)
Drake Cline NO2(R-4C 1976 T-4XC 1976)
FT101ES(1975)
Hallicrafters SX-111 HT-37 (1960)
Hallicrafters SX-99(1955) *HT-37

QSOs AM Sunday = 50
QSOs AM Tuesday = 30
Total AM QSOs = 80
Age of AM gear qualified= 809 Years
Combined Sunday and Tuesday AM score is then 80 x 809 = 64,720

SUMMARY
SSB: 120: 2,468: 296,160
AM: 80: 1,618: 129,440
CW: 102: 2,904: 296,208
TOTALS: 360,904
NOVICE RIG
Heathkit DX-40
Heathkit HW-8 2,000
BONUS RIG Hallicrafters SX-99 1,000
GRAND TOTAL: 363,904

Look forward to the next CX.
73
Matsumura Kazuto (JA3KNB)
575-0043 13-5 Kitade-chou
Shijyounawate-City OSAKA JAPAN
TEL:072-863-6667 FAX:072-863-6668
kazu@com-unity.co.jp
Click
here to return to score table.


RON K2RP

Click
HERE to see Ron's extensive classic gear collection.

SCORE
AM:
QSOs: 27
AGE: 537
SCORE: 14,439
SSB:
QSOs: 103
AGE: 1,774
SCORE: 182,722
CW:
QSOs: 57
AGE: 1,908
SCORE: 108,756
NOVICE BONUS 2000 (AT1/R100)
WRL BONUS 1000 (Globe Chief)
HALLI BONUS 1000 (SX71)

TOTAL SCORE: 309,977

Click here to return to score table.


N2ATB TONY

Hi Mac,
I participated in both the CW and Phone portions of the September 2015 Classic Exchange.

As always, I enjoyed the contest. I ran seven transceivers, two transmitters and two receivers. I operated AM for the first time in CX.

I look forward to the next CX in January.

Thanks for sponsoring this fine event. Attached are my log and score summary.

73,
Tony (N2ATB)

 Summary of CX Results for N2ATB  September 2015



Note: Equipment used for both the Phone and CW portion of the contest was:
a Kenwood TS-520S (37 years x 2 = 74 years), 
a Kenwood TS-830S (35 years x 2 = 70 years), 
a Kenwood TS-440S (29 years x 2 = 58 years), 
a Kenwood TS-130SE (35 years x 2 = 70 years), 
a Yaesu FT-101EX (39 years x 2 = 78 years), 
a Drake TR-4C (42 years x 2 = 84 years), 
a Heathkit DX-60A transmitter (51 years), 
a National NC-98 receiver (61 years) 
and a Ten-tec Argosy (35 years x 2 = 70 years). 

Equipment used only in the CW portion was: 
a Hallicrafters HT-40 transmitter (54 years) 
and a Hallicrafters SX-140 receiver (54 years). 

The total age of the gear used is: 
724 years for CW, 
248 years for AM 
and 504 years for SSB.

SSB 
QSOs: 63
Age: 504 years
Score: 31,752
AM
QSOs: 14
Age: 248 years
Score: 3,472
CW
QSOs: 69
AGE: 724
Score:49,956
Novice Bonus: 2,000
GRAND TOTAL: 87,180



N2BE JOHN

Hi Mac,
I had my doubts about a four-day-long ex event; and still do. Four intensive days of static and QRM !?! Are we going to kill someone?! With drama aside; you set the rules, and the" gang" followed. And ... as always, it was fun.

At the very start of the CW event, on Sunday morning, 40 meter propagation was wierd. No high-angle waves were being returned, so local QSOs weren't happening. I believe that may have been because of a solar flare. I was only able to complete ten QSOs by noontime; and only another dozen by 7:30 PM EOST, when I switched to 80 meters. Eighty was better, and I stayed there for the rest of the first day.

Some "blow-by-blow" highlights of the two CW days are as follows. I started out by working WC (W4BOH) who was running an "HT-9" and "2B" combo. I do not recall working we before with an "HT-9", so I am assuming that it is a "new" transmitter at W4BOH. FB "Old Buzzard" TX, OM. My third QSO was with Rocco (N6KN) who was running an "HT-32B" and "R4B" pair that was putting a great 589 signal into northwest-N], from CA.

Now, wait a minute ... the sun was shinning, the "D-layer" was activated, and we were on 40 meters; and yet there was Rocco. I guess Rocco never got the memo saying that he can't do that, HI. Actually, at that hour, the western USA is in a "gray zone" where the "D-layer" is not very ionized, so signals are able to merrily skip eastward towards increasing "D-layer" ionization. Once these signals are within 800 miles, or so, of a receiving station, they are already within the normal daytime skip distance for 40 meter reception, and they can be heard. At least, that is what science will tell you. However, those of us who have been on the bands long enough, know of another reason for such phenomena ... magic! Past experiences with Rocco tell me that it's really because he is signing "N6KN", and it has nothing to do with skip. It's all about "call magic."

Moving on, Al (W8UT) had a very noticeable signal on-the-air with his Johnson "Invader 2000".

Bill (K4JYS) was putting out quite an impressive signal himself with a homebrew, 20 watts input, 2A5 transmitter. Pairing this with a National "SW-3" regenerative receiver gave Bill a complete early-to-mid-1930s station; something that is very rarely heard on the bands today. GRT GNG OM. While Bill was showcasing the '30S, Jim (WT2W) was putting the 1920S on-the-air with his homebrew version of a 1929 Hartley MOPA, running 50 watts input with a 211 PA. Jim, however, opted to not attempt copying on modern bands with a 1920S receiver. Instead, he chose to press a much more capable Drake "2B" into service.

Another old and interesting transmitter design was Mario's (N2AK) homebrew pair of #53 tubes running 10 watts of power. I would guess that it may have been something a ham in the early-to-mid-1930s may have used. I know that this was the first time

The SSB Fone event was in sharp contrast to the CW event in that nothing used was older than the 1950s. Here, Dee (N2AK) was running the oldest SSB transmitter heard with his Central Electronics "20A". The CE "lOA' is credited as being the first commercially manufactured SSB ham transmitter and dates back to late-1953. The 20A" is a "deluxe" version of the "10A" and features bandswitching (i.e., no plug-in coils needed) and a tuning-eye tube. It was available less than a year after the 10A.
The next oldest transmitter heard was a Hallicrafters HT-37", which dates back to the later-1950s. John (K3MD) and Duane (KF4ZS) were the only two ops that I heard running this very popular transmitter in this September event. I, myself, ran a 1958 Gonset "GSB-1O0". The "GSB-1O0" has a lot going for it. It keys very well on CW, due to a grid-block keying scheme. The vfo is very stable. It has great audio, especially if you "open it up" with some basic preamp modifications. It is solidly built and a true "boatanchor". Its cabinet exactly matches the "NC-300/303" series of receivers in both dimensions and shape. While the National receivers weigh in at about 65 lbs, the GSB-lOO" is a hefty 85 1bs. (I did say "boatanchor'").
There are two main caveats to be aware of, however. One is the power-supply which is poorly engineered and needs reworking. A common problem in these transmitters is a shorted power transformer; so beware. The second main caveat is the manufacturer's crowding of the two rectifier tubes and P.A. tube into one corner with the power transformer. This makes for one really hot corner on the chassis. A fan, suspended from the transmitter's lid and blowing down over this area, takes care of this. Capable restorers that keep these items in mind and practice will be rewarded with a really nice classic, multi-mode transmitter/exciter.

Another piece of equipment that caught my attention was Al's (W8UT) Hammarlund "HX-500" transmitter. This is the very scarce "big brother" of the 1962 "HX-50" transmitter that I was using in this event. It would definitely be on my Christmas "wish list", HI. That one's a "keeper", Al.

Least, but not last (HI); I must mention Joe (WB8CTC) who was running a Ten Tec "Argonaut 505" on 40 meters, on a Sunday afternoon, and during a contest with only 2 watts of SSB power. He had a bodacious 59 signal here, from WV. Nice going, Joe.

WARNING - N2BE CLIMATE C.R.A.P CENTER REPORT FOLLOWS
At the N2BE Climate C.R.A.P. Center ("C-CC") we are starting to "close the book" on another very interesting hurricane season. Originally, the Center was concerned about a serious threat occurring in early October. Then, very suddenly, the data "accelerated" to favor a mid-September time period with a second threat period to occur in the second-half of October. Neither period produced a serious land falling storm in the eastern USA. However, in the time period extending from the last week of August to the first week of October, eight major storms occurred in the Atlantic Ocean. They were overlapping, and three reached hurricane status: Danny, Fred, and Joaquin. Joaquin grew into a monster and although it missed making landfall, it did flood a large area of the coastal southeast USA in late September to early-October.

Afterwards, the weather in the Atlantic became "quiet" until the second-half of October when Kate and Larry pounced on Cuba and the Florida-Georgia-Alabama areas, respectively.

All-in-all, the Climate Center did fairly well this year; especially if you consider that the middle or center date for that continuous eight storm run works out to be mid-September, It would appear that that series of overlapping storms was interpreted as being one single storm in the "C-CC.'s" forecast data.

So where do we go from here?! Well ... err ... underground. While everyone else is looking up for their weather, your "C-CC" has decided to look down. For the last year, or so, we have been monitoring the weather via a system of underground electrodes. It is my belief that intense terrestrial storms, including tornados, may someday be preventable or at least mitigated. Data, so far, has been encouraging; and we have been drinking to that (HI). Please be assured that at the "e-cc", our goals are always pure CR.A.P. ("Classic Radio and Antenna Preservation").

The seasonal displays in the stores lately remind me that we all have a lot to be thankful for.
In addition to the usual and obvious items, we are all thankful for you, Mac. Without people such as yourself giving up time and energy for "the greater good", there wouldn't be events such as the Classic Exchange.

May your filaments glow warm and brightly throughout this holiday season.

- 73- to all,
John
N2BE

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K3MD JOHN

CX CW
The Story:
80M ARC-5 blew fuse... plugged in power cord to modified HP-23B wrong. Later OK
TR-4 died on 40.... dirty switch.

Worked on rigs around 2 months to get them working. AC-1 works but puts out 0.2 W!!!!!

Did manage to make a 3 QSO's with hombrew junkbox TX... 6AQ5 final in Sept. CQ magazine.
Knight kit T60 worked OK.
Homebrew modified ARC-5 40 meter VFO works but puts out too many harmonics to be useful hi hi..
Call CQ with 100W out with no replies.
Used the drifty HG-10B as a VFO for the homebrew 6MJ6.

Really had fun.

SCORE
49 QSO's x 652 = 31,948

Will try SSB but have to operate as W3FRC/WFM during RTTY contest for the Frankford Radio Club in Phila.

Click
HERE for pictures of John and his rigs.

AND THE REST OF THE STORY
Got an OO notice for drift, chirp, and T8 signal... guess the HG-10 VFO, Knightkit T-60 and ARC-5 (with regulated non-keyed oscillator vfo) are working up to their design standard!
The "I Tried..." excuse

Congratulations John! You are the only (honest) operator reporting an OO notice this CX.

My ARC-5's are modified with voltage regulated unkeyed VFO.... they still chirp.
Maybe I should try to put together one of those DDS VFO things... they are down to $120... Will put it on my list of things to do.

Got 432 MM preamp to work.... ordered on Ukranian keying lever (CT 73).. why not?

Have an article out in CQ this month(homebrew retro QRP), and an article on antennas coming out in Nuts and Volts.

73,
John K3MD

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W4BOH WC / WILSON

CW CX
WORST PERFORMANCE EVER!

September 2015 CX
Fall Frustration

I wasn't sure I could summon energy for a writeup this time, but it would be a shame to let such valuable experience and learning opportunities pass by without proper reporting to the wider (At least most of us are wider.) community.

With Mac just up the road, I'm naturally aware of most important (?) CX goings on, either through eyeball communication or online news, so it never sneaks up on me. That doesn�t keep me from being stressed, of course, since, no matter when I start getting ready, household or old equipment issues will arise to fill all available prep time and wear me out! So, when I should be starting the operating part of CX I�m usually about worn down by domestic chores and old radio maintenance! Nevertheless, I soldier on; making my wife wish I had the same devotion to yard work and cabinetry.

Part of the thrill of CX is getting a previously dormant, or dead, piece of radio memorabilia to operate and impress other hams with my technical acumen and stubbornness. This time it was a Hallicrafters HT-9 and a 1940 Signal Shifter. There are a few Signal Shifters out there in radioland, but very few people have four of them and the earliest models are scarce. I now have all four of the major variations, 1938, 40, 42, and military, so it seemed a good idea to get at least the civilian models going.

Then there's the HT-9. Do you know what the HT stands for? It's Herniagenic Transmitter, being perhaps the heaviest 100W rig in modern times! Imagine starting with the 1938 Handbook and building four power supplies, a modulator, and a three tube RF section. That�s an HT-9! It�s high quality, conservatively designed, and well built. There�s NO common circuitry, not even in the low voltage power supply end. With a massive steel chassis and cabinet housing three power transformers, several nice chokes, a modulation transformer, and gobs of other components, we wind up with a 100W transmitter that weighs over a hundred pounds! It�s really hard to imagine depression scarred hams paying $250 for such a beast in 1938, even though times were slowly improving then. It�s even harder to imagine how the monsters got to the homes of the hams in one piece! One would have to be fairly well off just to have an indoor location in which to locate one! It takes up major space on a desk, or wherever it winds up, and it stays there, since two people are required to move one more than a few inches.

Can you believe it, two HT-9s on the same bench!

Inside, there are two 6L6s and an 814 in the RF section, two low level preamp tubes and FOUR 6L6s in the modulator and, don't forget, three LV rectifiers and a pair of 866s for the high (1KV) voltage. Each of five operating frequencies can be selected with a switch on the front, but behind the panel are up to TEN plug in tuned circuits to get the oscillator and/or doubler set up. If you want another frequency, you open the top and change a crystal. If you want another band, you also change one or two of the tuned circuits!

OK, you get the idea. I have two of the beasts, bought from a friend whose wife got them for a "nice surprise project" a decade or so ago. What was I thinking? After some biting of nails, I decided to dig into one of them for CX. Incredibly, after a precautionary change of all filter caps, it sprung to life with no problem worse than corroded contacts on a crystal socket! With the two rigs, I got three 814s, so I thought I was set. OOPS, one had no filament and one had only half rated output. The story of getting more 814s will have to wait for another report. I was happy to have an HT-9 going on 80 and 40 meters!

Then on to Signal Shifters. The 1938 and 1942 were still "working" from previous CX episodes, so all I had to do was get the new 1940 model working. It was newly bought from an Ebay seller who was cleaning up. Unfortunately, it was his garage he was cleaning, not his Shifter. After scraping off interior and exterior grime and changing all the filter caps, it actually came to life with only a rectifier tube replacement! Life being a relative term where Shifters are concerned, of course. I've learned that time and grief are saved if one just adds a handful of decoupling and bypass caps in all the strategic places before even starting to tame the drift and chirp so common to Shifters. Only a day or so was required to do all this work and tune the Shifter for max output on the band it was intended to grace during the contest! The band for each shifter was selected according to the amount of chirp each exhibited. Some do better on some bands than others, but none does anywhere near well on 20 meters! That's why I get nominated for "best chirp"!

With three Shifters working (80, 40, 20), it was time to integrate them into the station. The 80m Shifter drives an 807 in my prewar rig with an 810 final. It was pretty well ready to go, requiring only an hour or so to reconnect. For 40m, a Shifter drove the HT-9, so I could chirp and drift much more than the HT-9 did with crystal control. Then, to make sure my 40m chirp was heard, the HT-9 was fed into a pair of 813s to make about 400W output. The 20m setup was interesting. I 've fairly recently arranged for the PP 4-125A tetrodes in my 20m rig to operate in class AB something, so I can put it on SSB. The result is that it has tremendous gain, over 20dB, and the 5W output of a Shifter can drive it to 500+ Watts output! Neat, tremendous chirp, tremendous power.

With three Shifters, an HT-9, and three big amps to operate, there were many control lines, switches, and relays required to make it all work and change bands reasonably conveniently. Too many to discuss here, but nothing like the W8KGI system, of course.


Several somewhat silly Signal Shifters sending CQCX sequentially in September.
HT-9 on right My father's very vintage radio chair recently restored by my sons especially for CX

Then on to the receivers. The 1935 Comet Pro came up magically. It's unusual in that it does not use tracked tuned circuits. One sets the local oscillator according to several criteria, but basically to get the desired frequency to read at the desired number on the main dial. Then one peaks the antenna tuning for max signal. There�s no RF stage, so it needs all the peaking. The unique thing about all this is that one can set the local oscillator to be either above or below the signal frequency, which can be useful in dealing with images and a couple of other esoteric things. This year, after several CX outings, I found that I had been using the �wrong� oscillator setting and hurting the Pro�s performance by at least 10dB. When tuned up properly, it really took off and I used it for many more contacts than usual!

The Drake 2B had no problems. It's a remarkable little box, really a game changer, as written up in QST a while back.

Then there was the HRO-7. I've had it since I was a kid, going on 60 years. As far as I know, it has had no new tubes or maintenance during that time, even surviving a stint in a short rack in the back of my family�s 1954 Chevy station wagon! But it had been slowly losing sensitivity, so I decided to do a little tube testing and alignment. A few hours work produced considerable improvement on 40m, where I planned to use it, and I got to bed before midnight the night before CX. Pretty good, eh? Well, after only a few hours sleep, the excitement due to the impending CX operation disrupted my sleep, at about 0500 local. Good thing too, since when I went down to my basement shack to warm things up (The Shifters had been on all night, to minimize instability.), the newly perked up HRO-7 went dead! WOW, and no other real vintage receiver to hold up my age total. So out of the rack it came and onto the operating table. Where to start on a dead receiver, with only hours to go before the main event! Basic measurements showed several stages with low B+, some worse than others, but one near the front end much worse. Bad resistor, not too hard, and signals back. But hey, I still have a couple of hours, so follow up the measurements with more work. Several more new resistors and replacement of several leaky Micamold capacitors produced some real improvement and I was on the air at last!

After all that, the actual operation was a non event. I made about 60 QSOs and really appreciated hearing classic rigs from around the country. Propagation was awful (as bad as I can remember), so my count was well under half what I was hoping to achieve and I was worn out by a week�s repairing/setting up and rerepairing equipment. I sure hope others had better conditions and made many memorable QSOs. Did YOU work the HT-9? Was it memorable? I�m betting it was the only one you�ve ever heard. They were expensive and unwieldy and few were sold. Would you like to own one? It could be arranged. Who knows, you might even be able to have TWO! I think I worked two other Shifters.

This got pretty long, but I hope Mac can use it. At least we aren't using much paper for newsletters these days. And, if I still have your attention, I�m looking for documentation of Signal Shifters with zero or one VR tube. I know there were �some� made, but have no good info on them. If you have Shifter stories or information, I�d love to hear from you.

W4BOH QSOs: 62
AGE: 422
SCORE: 26, 164
NOVICE BONUS: 1,000
GRAND TOTAL: 27,164

WL W4BOH

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VE7BGP GERRY

SOAPBOX:
I only got to operate SSB on the Phone Portion of this Contest this year.

Propagation was so poor for CW the weekend before & the weather was nice so I also got exercise Cycling.

Just don't peddle any of your boatanchors!

73
Gerry

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JO3TAP TOMO

Dear Mac San
Nice to meet you.
This is the first time will participate in the CX.
I was introduced by JA3KNB / Kazu San to CX a few years ago. At first I was confused and can not understand this system.
It was a great experience that they participate as well to understand the CX.
Thought to respect and cherish for the old machine was very sympathy. This time, I participated in the QRP using the FT101(45y), which is said to be Japan's machine name.

CX Machinery List(2015 Sept)CW,SSB,AM
FT101S/(2w)(1970)(45y)x2
TOTAL 90 years

SCORE SUMMARY
53 CW QSOs(Tuesday)
90 Total age of CW gear(Tuesday)
CW Score 4,770
47 SSB QSOs(Sunday)
90 Total age of SSB gear(Sunday)
SSB Score 4,230
32 AM QSOs(Sunday)
90 Total age of AM gear(Sunday)
AM Score 2,880

GRAND Total 11,880


JO3TAP
Tomonori Sakata
3-7-1-806,Honjouhigashi,Kita-ku
Osaka-city,Osaka 531-0074
Japan
Tel 06-6374-2440
tomosakata@yk2.so-net.ne.jp

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K4JYS BILL

CW CX
COMMENTS: I didn''t have the time to put in a lot of hours on this one, but did manage to make some contacts on 40mtrs. N2BE and N2AK were the most worked. K3MSB with the SCR274N and W3ZT with his WW2 "spy" rig were the two odd stations I worked.

K4JYS EQUIP. USED:
HB 2A5 (1933 RADIO MAG) 20W INPUT/XTAL
NATIONAL SW-3 (1934)

LAFAYETTE STARFLITE (1962)
SX-101A (1959)

DX40 (1958)
HQ100 (1956)

TOTAL YEARS: 388
TOTAL QSOs: 24
BONUS POINTS: NOVICE XMTR DX40 (1000 PTS)
RCVR HQ100 (1000 PTS)
TOTAL BONUS PTS ---------------2000 PTS
TOTAL SCORE: 388 YRS X 24 QSOs + BONUS (2000) = 11312

Click
HERE to see Bill's 1933 station.

It's from an article in a 1933 'RADIO' magazine. It uses a 2A5 tube, about 20 watts input and xtal controlled. As you can tell, it's still in the 'tweaking' stage. The rcvr is an early National SW-3, possibly from 1934.

Had a good time and hope to be able to play a little more in the Jan/Feb event.

Again, tnx to Mac and gang for their efforts.

Tnx...73
de Bill K4JYS

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W2JEK DONALD

Mac, Here are the results of my Classic Exchange operation in September 2015. I was in the 3 rig class.

I like the two day idea. Especially when the bands get busy on Sunday. Was a lot of fun.

CW
QSOs: 23
AGE: 306
SCORE: 7,038
SSB
QSOs: 36
AGE: 306
SCORE: 828 NOVICE RIG BONUS: 1,000
BONUS RIG: 1,000
TOTAL SCORE: 10,866

73,
W2JEK
Donald Younger

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HOWIE WB2AWQ/7

CW CX
I was on today from 2145Z to 2315Z, set up two rigs such that I could switch in less than a minute, intensively calling CQ CX on both 40 and 20 alternating between the two every 10 minutes or so, no joy.

The bands were open as I heard a fair amount of activity on 20 (W1AW was coming in nicely here to Reno), and several stations on 40, all the way out to the east coast.

Now got Yom Kippur, so off the air.

CU all in Feb.

And I agree with Jim 8ZR, don't let the iron sit on the shelf! Mine get used regularly on all bands.

Sunday would have been better if not for the CME early Sunday morning. A index up to 43. Really snubbed the bands down.

Howie WB2AWQ

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W8UT AL

CW CX
Hi folks,
Well, Sun. was a bust for me, made 3 or 4 qso's with the Invader 2000 & SX-101A in the AM on 40. Nothing wanted to work for me in the afternoon, tried the Inv/SX on 80 in the evening, xyl said keyclicks tearing up her TV.

Then the KWM-2 didn't want to key up on CW for me, dunno what it's trouble is, worked last time OK on CW.

Probably will just vegetate tonite. Can't seem to get much motivation lately. Maybe next time. Too many other things lately, and I'm getting too old for distractions.

Well, the extra day didn't help me, I was outta town on CW Tues., just outta ummph for fone Tues.

Drake TR-4Cw 1964, age 2x(2015-1964)=2x51 = 102
Hallicrafters HT-322015-1957 = 58
Hallicrafters SX-1152015-1961 = 54
Hallicrafters SR-2000 2x(2015-1965) = 2x50 = 100
CollinsKWM-2 2x(2015-1959) = 2x56 = 112
HammarlundHX-5002015-1964 = 51
Drake 2-B2015-1961 = 54
Johnson Invader 20002015-1961 = 54
Hallicrafters SX-101A2015-1959 = 56
Drake B-twins 1968, age 2x(2015-1968)=2x47 = 94
Drake TR-4Cw 1964, age 2x(2015-1964)=2x51 = 102
Hallicrafters HT-322015-1957 = 58
Hallicrafters SX-1152015-1961 = 54
Hallicrafters SR-2000 2x(2015-1965) = 2x50 = 100
CollinsKWM-2 2x(2015-1959) = 2x56 = 112
HammarlundHX-5002015-1964 = 51
Drake 2-B2015-1961 = 54
Johnson Invader 20002015-1961 = 54
Hallicrafters SX-101A2015-1959 = 56

But, it was great, no matter. Thanks for hanging in there and making it better, keep it up.

73,
Al, W8UT

www.boatanchors.org
www.hammarlund.info
"There is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- half so much worth doing as simply messing about in boats"
Ratty, to Mole

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W8TM PAUL

CW CX
My equipment was as usual an SB-301 receiver (built by me in June, 1967), SB-401 transmitter (likewise in February, 1974) and an inverted vee fed with ladder line. The SB-301 is 48 years old and the SB-401 is 41 years old, for a total age of 89 years.

My CW log is attached (I didn't get on during the phone portion of this CX). There was severe QRN at my QTH, so I must apologize to those I couldn't copy and to those who had to repeat their info for me.

SCORE
No. of QSO: 44
Total gear age: 89
Total Score: 3,916

73,
Paul W8TM

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WQ8U MAC

CX CW
Even though the propagation did not help, the addition of Tuesday did open more opportunities, a good thing. On Sunday the bands were very quirky with rapid openings and closings and long periods of no signals. Sunday evening 80 meters seemed to stabilize and allowed good QSOs with the East Coast CXers. Tuesday was much better with 40 and 80 both being good CX hot spots.

My QTH is in the Hillsborough (NC) Historic District and the historic part is taken very seriously. The Historic District Commission is a like a HOA from Hell with the additional leverage of town zoning enforcement resources. My XYL agreed to put our garden on the town's garden tour this summer. I had several non-approved military surplus masts holding up wire antennas. They were fairly inconspicuous so I was never bothered by anyone (plus I never bothered anyone's TV, intercom, stereo, etc.). However with two days of garden tour visitors coming through, I figured my luck would run out. I took down the masts.

The District rules allow antennas but require a "mother may I?" formal request to the commission, complete with scaled drawings, sketches of anticipated appearance, description of materials, color, etc. to put up masts, flag poles, or towers. This may have been a good thing because it allowed me to rethink my antennas and start with something new.

With the help of Wilson, W4BOH, I initially put up a slightly bent 170 ft. long wire between two trees on my little city lot. While it would load well with the antenna tuner, the noise level was over S9 so it was not really very good. I removed part of the wire and ran ladder line up to the remaining end to make a 120 ft. end-fed Zepp up about 35 feet. That also loaded well and helped the noise problem. I was back in business!

Sunday began with my trusty old Drake Twins. I had the privilege of being Wilson's first CX contact with his recently resurrected HT-9. Not a bad signal for a simple old rig. The most interesting rig was Joel's (W3ZT) WWII suitcase spy transmitter. Not clear if the chirp was intentional or not but it certainly made the signal distinctive. Herald, KB0ROB, had a slightly cleaner signal with his '29 MOPA transmitter as did Jim, W8KGI, with his Navy Command Set.

Tuesday after dinner I fired up the Heathkit HW-101 and had a few good QSOs on 40 and 80 meters. The highlight was working old friend and mentor Jim, W8KGI, in NM. He gave me an RST 239 but with some repeats we did manage to exchange the needed data for a countable QSO. Amazing what a well-tuned HRO-60 and Jim's well trained golden ears can do.

PHONE CX Who knew there were so many stations in Texas who had such big signals - all over the bands. (Note to planning next year: Avoid the Texas QSO Party. It is worse than the Salmon Run!) I did manage several TXQP QSOs that I turned into CX exchanges but most operators were with serious contesters who were onto the next exchange before I could explain...

An uncontrollable conflict kept me out of the Tuesday session so I have no phone score.

73
Mac WQ8U

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K3MSB MARK

CW CX
I'm still fighting the intermittent rough CW note on my BC-459A. The TX was running pretty good a few months ago, then it got a rough note all of a sudden. I gave the front panel a good thump (in a loving manner of course....) and the problem cleared up. So tonight I reflowed a lot of solder connections (that I'm pretty sure I did last time.....). We'll see.

I was on 20M this evening and couldn't raise anybody, so went to the bench to play with the project de jur.......

I think I made 10 QSOs on 40 and 80 with my SCR-274N on Sunday, which is the worst I think I've ever done. Best DX was Jim W8KGI in New Mexico on 40M.

I hope condx are better for the winter event.

73
Mark K3MSB

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N7CQR DAN

My first CX event, and I was only able to operate Tuesday evening. I did have a lot of fun, once I got my equipment up and running. TX was a DX 40, and rcvrs were an HRO 50T1 and Collins 75A3.

The big issue was sorting out an electronic T/R switch which I built from a QST article from 2012. It's pretty slick as it allows full break in keying, but it never worked well with the DX 40 as I was using the Heath VF-1, which was creating a lot of havoc with the receivers!

I switched to crystals for the DX 40 and everything worked like a charm. Of course I only had 2 40 M xtals but still managed to get a few guys. Sure is nice to have full QSK. I may have to figure out how to power the VF`1 separately from the DX 40 which may help it.

Funny story about the VF 1 is that I put an ad in Electric Radio for one, and got a response from a gentleman in CA that built it in 1959 but never even turned it on! What was great was that he gave it to me for the cost of shipping with the proviso that I use it. Well-I'm trying to, but more work is needed...He did a fine job of assembly and after rewiring the plug I got it going and aligned,but it's not the most stable VFO, in keeping with it's reputation. I'll keep plugging away.

Other radios to come on line are a Conar , and a Collins 32V3 to match with the 'A3.

See you all next event!
Glad you are doing this!

SCORE
CW 6 QSOs 186 yrs = 1,116 points

Dan Presley n7cqr@arrl.net

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K3KYR JEFF

CW CX
I missed the whole September CX due to being called out of town for a family health emergency, but plan on being active in Jan. From the reports I've read conditions were poor anyway.
We all hope your family health emergency was not serious and everyone is doing well now.

Lets hope winter conditions prove better.

To Mac and the rest of the crew that put so much time and effort into the CX events, a big thank to you all.

73,
Jeff K3KYR

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W8ZR JIM

CW CX
I was plagued with problems on Sunday. Spent most of the day trying to fix things. These boatanchors don't like to sit unused on a shelf!

I'll plan on being on 80 and possibly 40 tonight (Tuesday), if I get home in time.
I've 2 rigs: a TBS50D/homebrew RX and, at the other extreme, a Ranger2/Desk KW/SX88.
That is really from one to the other!

73,
Jim w8zr

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